Bosei Redux

After Friday night’s successful printing of the P. bosei crania, we decided to go for round two of tech fun with our buddy, KNMER 406 – looking for another 3D print and a cardboard cranium. 

The printing specs stayed the same (quarter size, MakerBot Replicator 1, ABS plastic, etc.) with the resolution upped to "fine" (0.1 mm layer height vs. 0.3 mm.)  And with the recent Domínguez-Rodrigo et al's paper in PLOS One, printing a bosei seemed particularly apropos.

 

Finishing the print of KNMER 406.

Finishing the print of KNMER 406.

Cleaning the skull.

Cleaning the skull.

Raft, structural supports, and cranium

Raft, structural supports, and cranium

Both prints side by side -- fine resolution on the left and coarse resolution on the right.

Both prints side by side -- fine resolution on the left and coarse resolution on the right.

With the MakerBot cheerfully whirring away in the background, I had a chance to laser cut and assemble the full-size 406 cranium from cardboard.  The downloadable pdf from African Fossils wasn’t sized for the Trotec laser cutter – however, with Autodesk 123D Make it was fairly straightforward to resize the print sheets to fit the trays. This pdf is the same full-size crania, recut to sheets that fit the TechShop’s equipment.  The cardboard sheets are quartered from Office Max science fair boards (ironic, yes), and the “pin holes” are set to the size of bamboo skewers. 

Laser cutting sheet one of the cardboard cranium.

Laser cutting sheet one of the cardboard cranium.

All of the pieces cut out, ready to be assembled.  Dark holes are for the bamboo skewers and gluing alignment.

All of the pieces cut out, ready to be assembled.  Dark holes are for the bamboo skewers and gluing alignment.

Gluing, aligning, gluing, aligning, gluing, gluing, gluing... Art really imitates science.

Gluing, aligning, gluing, aligning, gluing, gluing, gluing... Art really imitates science.

Final cranium.  The cardboard and its wavy corrugation really accent the slight distortion on the right side.  One of the TechShop employees suggested that the project could really benefit from googly eyes.  

Final cranium.  The cardboard and its wavy corrugation really accent the slight distortion on the right side.  One of the TechShop employees suggested that the project could really benefit from googly eyes.
 

Great blending of art, science, and technology and major kudos, again, to African Fossils for their efforts to publish downloadable 3D models.